appeal

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Ray Burton Christmas Home Appeal

Published December 18, 2014 by misty534

Ray Burton Christmas Home Appeal

As an ex Bryn Estyn resident myself. I as deeply saddened to read about another ex-resident- Ray Burton’s situation. It got me thinking. Discussions with others have led to this plea. Lets get Ray housed for Christmas. He won’t get any cash from this campaign just a bed, warmth, food and hopefully some company. He’ll also discover there’s people out there who actually care enough to donate a couple of pounds. This should raise his confidence. Ray is one of thousands of homeless. We can’t help them all. But we can get this man out of his cave for Christmas. Ideally I’d like to put a few in his place but that’s another story. Go on then, just click and donate. Imagine his face when he finds out because he doesn’t know yet.

RayChristmashome

Ray Burton grew up in the South Wales Valleys and things started going very wrong in his life when he was put into care at the age of 13. Ray (52) will spend Christmas in a cave – because he has nowhere else to live. He spent a period of time at the now notorious BRYN ESTYN  children’s care home in Wrexham, where he says he was abused. “I had a very rough childhood but before I was put in care, I got into nature and even had a pet fox,”

Ray Burton moved into his makeshift home on Llandudno’s Great Orme
limestone headland because he has nowhere else to live
Cave dweller: Homeless man Ray Burton in his makeshift home “I think it’s this love for the outdoors which makes life in the cave endurable.”

Cold and damp: Ray Burton and his tent inside the cave Ray Burton moved into his makeshift home on Llandudno’s Great Orme limestone headland after he was told to leave his flat.A year ago the future had looked brighter for the former builder as Hope Restored, a charity which helps the homeless in Llandudno, found him a flat.”I moved in on January 1 and lived there for four months.”I was secure, warm, had no debt and the place was lovely but I had invited a few friends from the streets one night and things got out of hand.”The landlord said it wasn’t to happen again, but my so-called friends wouldn’t leave me alone, and were constantly hanging around drinking outside and I was asked to leave.

Softly spoken, polite and articulate, Ray says he hit rock bottom again about a month ago, when all his possessions were burnt in the cave. Ray, who suffers from alcoholism, was left with nothing but the clothes on his back.”That was a very bad time, I’ve no idea who did it but I was left with nothing and had to start all over again.”Brenda came to the rescue, she clothed me and bought me another tent, sleeping bag and a little stove.”Living in the cave isn’t too bad. I’ve got my radio and have an amazing view, it’s also very peaceful.”But I do get very cold sometimes, and I’m asthmatic so living in there isn’t good for my chest as it’s damp.”I also get very dirty because of the dust on the walls and the mud.” Hard year: Ray Burton is hoping for better fortune in 2015

He added: “Christmas Day will just be like any other day for me. “I’ll be trying to keep warm and will be eating the food parcel Hope Restored will give me. “I hope 2015 will be a better year, I just hope I’ll get a flat as I am getting too old to be living on the streets.”

Ray Burton outside the cave in Llandudno
UPDATE WE HAVE JUST FOUND OUT RAY HAS BEEN GIVEN A FLAT, BUT NEEDS FURNITURE, FURNISHINGS AND FOOD
FOR CHRISTMAS

Story

Max Clifford loses appeal against eight-year jail term

Published November 7, 2014 by misty534

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DISGRACED PR guru Max Clifford has lost a challenge against his eight-year jail sentence for sex offences.

The sentence was upheld by three Court of Appeal judges in London today.

Clifford, 71, was jailed in May after being convicted of a string of indecent assaults, carried out between 1977 and 1984, using his celebrity connections to lure women.

The former celebrity agent, who branded his accusers “fantasists”, denied the charges, but was convicted at London’s Southwark Crown Court.

Announcing the appeal court’s decision, Lord Justice Treacy, who heard the case with Mr Justice Turner and Judge Michael Pert, said the sentence was “justified”.

At a recent appeal hearing, Clifford’s barrister Richard Horwell QC told the three judges that Clifford’s last offence was committed 29 years ago, “since when he has led an industrious life, and devoted a considerable part of his time to charitable works for which he has raised substantial funds”.

The trial judge had “accepted that he is no longer a danger to women and that he will not commit further offences”.

Mr Horwell said that for a number of reasons the sentence imposed was “too long”, adding: “Although the sentencing process must reflect modern attitudes, and I fully accept that that is our law, the sentencing process must not abandon common sense and fairness.”

Rosina Cottage QC, for the Crown, said the total sentence imposed was one the trial judge was “entitled to reach”.

When sentencing Clifford, Judge Anthony Leonard told him his personality and position in the public eye were the reasons his crimes were not revealed earlier.

He said: “The reason why they were not brought to light sooner was because of your own dominant character and your position in the world of entertainment which meant that your victims thought that you were untouchable, something that I think you too believed.”

He added: “These offences may have taken place a long time ago, when inappropriate and trivial sexual behaviour was more likely to be tolerated, but your offending was not trivial, but of a very serious nature.”

Clifford is currently serving his sentence at Littlehey Category C men’s prison in Cambridgeshire.

Announcing the court’s decision today, Lord Justice Treacy said: “It seems to us that, after consideration of the individual offences and the application of modern sentencing attitudes reflected in the guidelines, but tempered by the need to have regard to the statutory maximum available at the time, an overall sentence of eight years was justified and correct.”

It was a “just and proportionate” sentence “taking account of considerations of harm and culpability together with aggravating factors and such mitigation as was available to the appellant”.

Lord Justice Treacy said Clifford was sentenced to a total of eight years on eight counts of indecent assault relating to four victims who were “young and vulnerable” at the time of the offences.

He said: “Each was affected in respect of confidence and relationships and was harmed by what had been done to her.”

In considering the seriousness of any offence the court “must consider the offender’s culpability and any harm which the offence caused”.

The judge said: “Sexual offending will by its very nature cause harm at the time the offence is committed, but it is well recognised that for many victims significant harm persists for a considerable period afterwards.

“This is a case where it is clear that the effect of what was done to the victims was not something from which they recovered quickly.

“The appellant’s actions towards these victims had long term consequences for their lives. This is clearly a highly material circumstance for this court to consider.”

The judge said Clifford’s offending involved “an abuse of a powerful position coupled with deceit”.

There had been a “gross abuse of power and influence”.

Four girls or young women were involved, one under the age of 16.

Lord Justice Treacy said the offending took place over a period of several years and there was a significant age difference between Clifford and his victims – at the time he would have been in his mid-30s to early 40s.

He had never been convicted of any other criminal offence “and the trial did not reveal any other evidence of sexual offending after the period with which the counts were concerned”.

The judge said: “Thus, there was a period of nearly 30 years without further offending before these matters came to court and the appellant was convicted.”

He added: “Over that period there was evidence before the judge of a positive nature showing involvement in a variety of charitable works which the appellant had not publicised. The judge also had a number of positive character references.”

Lord Justice Treacy went on: “It is clear, however, that over the period of offending, these young women were targeted by the appellant who actively misled them and exploited their desire to succeed in their careers for his own purposes.

“The appellant was a dominant personality and in a powerful position within the world of entertainment and media.

“This enabled him to do what he did and to convince the victims that there was no point in complaining because no one would listen to them.

“He was thus able to lead a double life, progressing in his career, whilst his victims, affected by what he had done to them, felt powerless to complain.”

The judge said Clifford had “lost potential credit by contesting the trial and in addition lost potential mitigation as he showed no remorse at any stage for what he had done”.

Paedophile loses plea to quash court ruling

Published May 28, 2013 by misty534

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APPEAL REJECTED: Kenneth Trotter, who is serving three years in prison, had his appeal against a Sexual Offences Prevention Order rejected by a judge and two magistrates.

A convicted paedophile described as an “exceptionally dangerous man” after he was jailed earlier this year has lost a legal challenge to have a court order quashed.

 

Kenneth Trotter, 78, who is serving a three-year jail term, had launched an appeal at Preston Crown Court against a Sexual Offences Prevention Order made last November at Blackpool Magistrates’ Court.

But his appeal has been rejected by a judge and two magistrates. Trotter, who was convicted and served a substantial prison sentence for numerous sex offences involving boys and young men in Australia, came back to live in Blackpool last May.

He was jailed for three years in January for twice breaching the SOPO order, which requires him to tell police of a change of address within three days.

He was not at Preston Crown Court when Judge Stuart Baker handed down the latest decision. As well as losing his appeal, Trotter will have to pay £3,000 towards the costs of the case.

His four grounds of appeal had been that his case was not properly conducted by a solicitor acting for him, an appeal against the conviction and sentence in Australia was pending, the application was an abuse of process because his appeal in Australia had not been determined and he therefore could not have a fair hearing here and that he was denied an opportunity at the Magistrates’ Court to give evidence.

But Judge Baker and the magistrates stated in their judgment: “Having considered all the evidence in the case we find that Mr Trotter’s behaviour while in Blackpool demonstrates that he will, if he can find a way to do so, avoid providing the police with a genuine address and he will try to create circumstances in which he can have access to young and probably vulnerable people, to give himself the opportunity to commit sexual offences against them.”

Trotter had voiced concerns that a ban on door to door sales would prevent him from continuing his business as a self employed sewing machine repair man. He also submitted the SOPO would effectively make him homeless, claiming every time the police became aware of where he was staying, or proposing to stay, pressure would be put on a landlord to try to prevent him taking the accommodation.

But the bench found the door-to-door ban was “entirely appropriate” and wouldn’t make it impossible for him to conduct his business.

The judge in January described Trotter as an “exceptionally dangerous man” when he gave him three years’ jail for the two offences of breaking the terms of an interim Sexual Offences Prevention Order.

 

the Gazette

 

Appeal from Callington pervert Nicholas Hobbs dismissed by top judges

Published March 20, 2013 by misty534

PERVERT from Callington who was jailed for the sexual abuse of four little girls has failed to convince top judges he should be released into the community.

Nicholas Wayne Hobbs’ crimes only came to light years after he abused the girls, one of whom was only four years old at the time she was molested.

  1. Nicholas Hobbs

    CHILD ABUSER: Nicholas Wayne Hobbs has had his appeal rejected at the Court of Appeal.

Last year, the 50-year-old pleaded guilty to 17 indecent assaults at Truro Crown Court and on September 7 he was sentenced to three years and four months’ imprisonment.

Recorder Paul Dunkels, QC, said: “You threatened them to secure their silence.

“No sentence I can pass can give back these women, as they are now, the innocence of youth which you took away.”

Hobbs later appealed the verdict, but on Friday, March 15 he saw the sentence upheld by Mr Justice Mackay and Judge James Moss, QC, at the Court of Appeal in London.

Rejecting Hobbs’ complaints, Judge Moss said the sentence was “wholly merited” for offences against four victims, spread over a 16-year period.

Hobbs, of West Prince Farm, Sevenstones, near Callington, claimed that his abuse of the prepubescent girls was down to his “curiosity”.

All of them complained of him touching their private parts and said their relationships had been affected by what happened in their childhood.

The sentencing judge rejected his claim of curiosity, saying the motivation which lay behind his offending was his own sexual gratification.

Hobbs had engaged in “manipulative grooming” to put himself in a position where he could assault children, stealing the “innocence of their youth”, the judge said.

His lawyers argued that the sentence was “wrong in principle” and that the judge should have given him a sentence to allow him to be treated in the community.

But the judges dismissed the appeal. Judge Moss said: “The sentence, albeit tough, was not arguably manifestly excessive.”

Hobbs is prohibited from living in the same household of any child under 18 unless he is given the express consent of the social services in the area.

He must have no contact with a child under 18, except when it is not easily avoidable in the course of daily life or with the consent of a parent or guardian who has knowledge of his conviction.

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