Westminster Paedophiles

All posts tagged Westminster Paedophiles

MI5 warned Thatcher about Westminster pedophiles, no action taken

Published July 23, 2015 by misty534

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 16.41.16

A former MI5 director warned Margret Thatcher’s administration that allegations concerning one MP who had a “penchant for small boys” could cause the government serious political embarrassment.

Investigators currently looking into the historic child sex abuse scandal found that nothing had been done about the potential threat to children, but rather the security service had warned the allegations could damage the reputation of Thatcher’s government.

Newly discovered files show former spy chief Sir Anthony Duff had written to Cabinet Secretary Sir Robert Armstrong in 1986 to warn him of claims made about the behavior of one MP.

The new documents were analyzed by the head of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), Peter Wanless and Richard Whittam QC.

Other politicians whose names were mentioned in the review of new material include former Cabinet minister Leon Brittan, Thatcher’s aide Peter Morrison, ex-diplomat Sir Peter Hayman and former minister William van Straubenzee.

Wanless and Whittam said the documents showed that threats to children were not taken seriously.

There were a number of references across the papers we saw that reinforced the observation we made in our review that issues of crimes against children, particularly the rights of the complainant, were given considerably less serious consideration than would be expected today.

“To give one striking example, in response to claims from two sources that a named Member of Parliament ‘has a penchant for small boys’ matters conclude with acceptance of his word that he does not and the observation that ‘at the present stage … the risks of political embarrassment to the government is rather greater than the security danger.’ The risk to children is not considered at all.”

The new group of papers, which name former establishment figures as well as references to the Kincora children’s home in Northern Ireland where boys were abused, were “found in a separate Cabinet Office store of assorted and unstructured papers.”

Wanless and Whittam’s inquiry noted last year that they hadn’t unearthed evidence that any records had been deliberately destroyed and added they had “found nothing to cause us to alter the conclusions drawn or recommendations made in our review.”

But they also said the discovery of new papers would not be “helpful” in recovering public trust in the inquiry, which was completed last year.

An NSPCC spokesman said: “This is a clear illustration, as the original review revealed, of the misplaced priorities of those operating at [the] highest levels of government, where people simply weren’t thinking about crimes against children and the consequences of those crimes in the way that we would expect them to. It reiterates the need for an inquiry that will explore this in depth.”

RT News

Home Office under fire over missing child abuse files review

Published July 23, 2015 by misty534

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 16.33.25

Newly discovered government documents also relate to senior Westminster figures, including Leon Brittan

The Home Office is facing criticism over a review into the department’s handling of the 1980s Dickens dossier of paedophilia allegations.

Peter Wanless, chief executive of the NSPCC, was brought in to investigate in July after an internal Home Office review found no evidence of a dossier of suspected child abusers compiled by Conservative MP Geoffrey Dickens in the 1980s.

The internal review also found that between 1979 and 1999 the department had “lost or destroyed” 114 files relating to child abuse.

Wanless has also reportedly failed to uncover the files or the dossier and is expected to criticise the Home Office’s record-keeping and archiving when he publishes his report later today.

He is expected to agree with the department’s findings that there is no evidence to suggest the missing files had been removed or destroyed inappropriately.

The Home Office says the department did consider the allegations contained in the Dickens dossier at the time and passed on 13 “items of information” to the police and prosecutors.

However, Labour MP Simon Danczuk, who raised the issue of the missing dossier earlier this year, has complained that the timescale for the Wanless review has not allowed for more sophisticated digital tracing techniques to be used.

“That raises serious questions about the scope of the investigations and, frankly, leaves a question mark over any of its findings,” he told the Daily Telegraph.

Mark Sedwill, the department’s permanent secretary, said the review had analysed a central database containing 746,000 files from the period 1979 to 1999.

Labour has also been critical of Home Secretary Theresa May’s decision to publish the Wanless report in a written ministerial statement rather than face questions from MPs in the Commons.

“The failure by Wanless to throw any new light on the fate of the allegations by Dickens is likely to fuel the continuing row over the establishment of a national overarching inquiry into historical allegations of child sex abuse,” says The Guardian.

The Home Secretary has already apologised for the delays to the overarching inquiry after Fiona Woolf, the second chair appointed to lead the inquiry stood down over her links to Lord Brittan.

UK News

MI5 letter unearthed by Cabinet Office in child abuse inquiry

Published July 23, 2015 by misty534

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 12.49.44

An MI5 letter warning of the risk of “political embarrassment” from child sexual abuse claims has been found.

A 1986 note – by then head of MI5, Sir Anthony Duff – followed warnings an MP had a “penchant for small boys”.

The newly uncovered material, found in a search by the Cabinet Office, was not disclosed to a 2014 Home Office review.

Its author, the NSPCC’s Peter Wanless, said the new documents showed the risk to children was “not considered at all” but did not alter his findings.

The papers have come to light months after the conclusion of an official review into whether allegations of child abuse were covered up by the Home Office in the 1980s.

The review – written by Mr Wanless and Richard Whittam QC and published in November – examined how the Home Office dealt with files alleging child abuse between 1979 and 1999.

It concluded that there was no evidence of records being deliberately removed or destroyed.

BBC

Former Wokingham MP Sir William van Straubenzee named in Goverment child abuse papers

Published July 23, 2015 by misty534

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 13.24.51

Sir William, who died in 1999, is one named alongside former Home Secretary Leon Brittan in the papers

Leading Westminster figures from the 1970s and 80s including the late Wokingham MP Sir William van Straubenzee have been named in Government child abuse documents, it has been reported.

An investigation by Sky News has forced the Government to admit papers do exist relating to the behaviour of former MPs,

Sir William, who died in November 1999, is named alongside Mrs Thatcher’s former parliamentary secretary the late Sir Peter Morrison, former Home Secretary Sir Leon Brittan, who died in January, and former diplomat the late Sir Peter Hayman.

Sky News reports the contents of the paper have not been revealed and said the papers have been shared with police and will be passed to the Child Abuse Enquiry led by Justice Lowell Goddard.

Sir William was education minister from 1970-72 and Northern Ireland Minister from 1972-74,

Mrs Thatcher sacked him from the front bench after the 1979 General Election.

He was given a knighthood in 1981 and was MP until 1987, where he was replaced by current MP John Redwood.

Further questions raised about whether or not Lord Janner is fit to stand trial

Published April 20, 2015 by misty534

Labour peer ruled too unwell to face child abuse charges signed document requesting a leave of absence from the House of Lords just eleven days ago

Lord Janner.
Lord Janner. Photograph: David Karp/Bloomberg News

Lord Janner of Braunstone, the Labour peer ruled too unwell with dementia by the prosecuting authorities to face child abuse charges, could face further police inquiries after the House of Lords confirmed that he signed an official document just eleven days ago.

A letter sent to the clerk of the parliaments that has been released to the Guardian shows Janner’s signature appeared on a request for a leave of absence from the House of Lords on 9 April.

A spokesman for the House of Lords said on Monday that the signature matches previous examples from the peer, and there is no reason to believe that it was signed by someone else.

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 00.28.59

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 00.28.06

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 00.28.22

The letter and the parliamentary authorities’ assessment of Janner’s signature raise further questions about whether or not the peer is fit to stand trial.

A spokeswoman for Leicestershire police said they will consider contacting the House of Lords about the letter as part of Operation Enamel, their ongoing investigation into Janner and other alleged paedophiles.

Last week, Alison Saunders, the director of public prosecutions, ruled that the former MP for Leicester West would not face the courts because four separate doctors – two appointed by prosecutors and two by Janner’s family – ruled that he was unfit to plead or understand the court.

People with dementia have been prosecuted before the courts. But the decision over whether an individual is fit to stand trial is made by theCrown Prosecution Service on a case-by-case basis. Janner was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2009.

At least 10 men with dementia have been convicted of child sex offences since 2010, including six in the past year.

Janner’s letter was addressed to David Beamish, the clerk of the parliaments, and arrived at his desk on 9 April.

The peer wrote: “I am writing to request Leave of Absence from the House of Lords for the duration of the 2015 Parliament. I understand that this will take effect on the next sitting day.”

The letter was signed by Lord Janner, but the signature has been blanked out by the House of Lords to avoid any risk of ID theft. Below, someone has printed “Lord Janner of Braunstone” on the bottom of the letter.

Asked whether Janner’s signature on the letter warranted further inquiries given the public outcry over whether he is fit to stand, a House of Lords spokesman said: “The signature on the form matches the signature of Lord Janner of Braunstone. There is nothing for the Clerk of the Parliaments to investigate.”

Janner also wrote to Beamish on 3 October to indicate that he wished to go on leave of absence, the spokesman said.

Campaigners said that the letter points to another reason why Saunders was wrong to drop the prosecution of Janner.

Simon Danczuk, the former Labour MP for Rochdale who has co-written a book about the Cyril Smith child sex abuse scandal, said: “The decision on whether Lord Janner is fit to stand trial should be resolved before the courts and not in a clandestine and quasi judicial way behind closed doors.

“If Lord Janner is incapable of answering questions and going before a court then how can he possibly remain a possible legislator in the House of Lords? It’s bringing the whole place into disrepute.”

In a highly unusual move, the DPP said last week there was sufficient evidence to charge the peer with 22 offences against nine alleged victims between the 1960s and 1980 – but it was not in the public interest to prosecute because of Janner’s ill health.

If a person’s mental state is a consideration, then their fitness to plead can be tried. If they are found unfit to plead, then the facts of the case are tried rather than the person, so the accused receives neither the same verdict nor the same sentence as an ordinary defendant.

Leicestershire police has criticised Saunders’ decision, as have a number of Janner’s alleged victims.

Hamish Baillie, 47, who was one of the nine people lined up to give evidence against Janner over child sex abuse allegations, said the decision not to prosecute the Labour politician “beggars belief”.

Waiving his right to anonymity, the father-of-three told the Daily Mail he was molested by Janner during a game of hide-and-seek in a park, when he was a 15-year-old resident of a children’s home in Leicestershire.

He said: “I don’t think anybody other than the victims and the police involved in the Operation Enamel inquiry understand how perverted a man Lord Janner is.”

It also emerged on Monday that Saunders sought advice on Janner from a CPS barrister who recently worked in the same chambers as the Labour politician’s son. Neil Moore QC, Saunders’ principal legal adviser, was based at 23 Essex Street chambers with Daniel Janner QC until late last year.

A CPS spokesman said: “Saunders made the decision not to prosecute on her own and Moore had told her he had been in chambers with Lord Janner’s son before discussing the case.”

A spokeswoman for the CPS said that any related further inquiries are a matter for the police. “Lord Janner is suffering from a degenerative dementia which is rapidly becoming more severe. He requires continuous care both day and night.
“His evidence could not be relied upon in court and he could not have any meaningful engagement with the court process, and the court would find it impossible to proceed. The condition will only deteriorate, there is no prospect of recovery,” she said.

Janner’s family said last week that he was entirely innocent of any wrongdoing.
“As the Crown Prosecution Service indicated today, this decision does not mean or imply that any of the allegations that have been made are established or that Lord Janner is guilty of any offence,” a statement said.

The Guardian

Victim claims he was abused by VIP paedophile ring

Published April 7, 2015 by misty534

Screen Shot 2015-04-07 at 13.59.28

A child sex abuse victim has claimed he was molested by “very powerful people” at several locations connected to an alleged VIP paedophile ring.

Richard Kerr, who was a victim of abuse at Kincora Boys’ Home in Belfast, has claimed he was also attacked at the Dolphin Square luxury apartment complex and Elm Guest House, both located in London.

It is thought to be the first time that the three places have been linked in relation to claims of historical sex abuse by influential Westminster figures.

Mr Kerr was abused at Kincora in the 1970s and alleges he and two other boys were hand-picked to be trafficked to London in 1977 and sexually abused by men.

Both of the other men have since taken their own lives, Mr Kerr told Channel 4 News.

Insisting that the VIP paedophile ring did exist, he claims to have been abused in London by “men who had control and power over others”, some of whom he believes were politicians.

Dolphin Square in Pimlico, London, is said to have been used by an alleged VIP paedophile ring.

Dolphin Square in Pimlico, London, is said to have been used by an alleged VIP paedophile ring
Dolphin Square in Pimlico, London, is said to have been used by an alleged VIP paedophile ring Credit: Lewis Whyld/PA Wire

His most violent experience allegedly took place at the Elm Guest House in Barnes, south London, where he claims to have been tied up with his hands behind his back while men took photographs.

When the guest house was raided by police in 1981 it was reported that officers had found whips, chains and ropes.

Mr Kerr also claimed to have been taken to Dolphin Square, a block of apartments near Parliament which is now at the centre of allegations of child abuse and murders being investigated by Scotland Yard.

Asked if he would name his abusers, Mr Kerr said:

I’m still in some fear. Even though I’m willing to take the courage.

I need to know that I can have faith in our government but right now, when they’re not willing to bring Kincora into Westminster, the message that sends to me is that there’s some kind of cover-up and there has been.

– RICHARD KERR

Last July, Home Secretary Theresa May announced a major public panel inquiry into whether paedophiles were sheltered in government, the NHS, police, the courts and the BBC.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission said earlier this month it is investigating 17 allegations of a police cover-up in relation to a VIP child sex abuse ring ranging from the 1970s to 2000s.

The full interview with Mr Kerr will be shown on Channel 4 News at 7pm.

ITV news

Paedophile Ring: More Questions Than Answers

Published March 21, 2015 by misty534

byuusauiiaaej6t

The investigation of alleged corruption in the Metropolitan Police relating to child sex offences from the 1970s to the 2000s leaves a lot to be desired, writes Steven Walker


The news that the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) is investigating 14 separate referrals of alleged corruption in the Metropolitan Police relating to child sex offences from the 1970s to the 2000s might at first glance be seen as hopeful, especially to survivors of child sexual abuse who are pinning their hopes on receiving justice.

But the Home Secretary’s qualified answer to a question put to her by the home affairs select committee regarding immunity for police officers from prosecution under the Official Secrets Act gave the game away.

Her lack of certainty is guaranteed to stop any police officer coming forward with relevant information for the IPCC.

This latest twist in the long-running scandal of an Establishment cover-up of historic sexual abuse against vulnerable children could have another consequence. The long-delayed Goddard inquiry has just got under way after two false starts with inquiry heads acknowledged as too close to the Establishment and unable to secure the confidence of sexual abuse survivors.

But with these twin investigations pursuing parallel courses, covering much of the same ground and focussing on the activities of notorious paedophile Cyril Smith and other MPs, there is a danger of confusion and potential legal conundrums. This could lead to witnesses being called by both inquiries and evidence compromised.

The result could be a legal nightmare leading to stalemate and further delay at best. All of which will suit the Establishment which on past record is very adept at concealing truth, losing evidence and making sure the tracks of abusers are completely covered.

Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg still refuses to order a full-scale investigation into which senior Liberal Party figures knew all about Cyril Smith and his prolific paedophile activity.

Conservatives Edwina Currie, Gyles Brandreth and Rod Richards have previously made damning statements of how well known in Westminster circles it was that MP Peter Morrison was a dangerous paedophile and yet his career was unaffected as he rose to be deputy chairman of the Conservative Party. He was Margaret Thatcher’s parliamentary private secretary in 1990 and her campaign manager that same year despite this knowledge having been around for many years.

Tim Fortescue, Edward Heath’s Chief Whip from 1970-73, made public on Michael Cockerell’s BBC documentary in 1995 Westminster’s Secret Service that there was a tried and tested method for cover-ups named the dirt book system.

Talking about the role of the chief whip, Fortescue said: “For anyone with any sense who was in trouble would come to the whips and tell them the truth … a scandal involving small boys … we would do everything we can because we would store up brownie points and if I mean, that sounds a pretty, pretty nasty reason, but it’s one of the reasons because if we could get a chap out of trouble then, he will do as we ask forever more.”

Just after announcing, 18 months ago, that the Metropolitan Police were about to arrest a former Tory Cabinet minister,

Commander Peter Spindler, who had been leading the police criminal investigation into organised paedophiles sexually abusing young children from a council children’s home in Richmond upon Thames, was taken off the investigation and moved sideways to another job.

The suggestion is that powerful figures had complained about Spindler’s work in pursuing three major paedophile investigations and he had to be stopped.

More evidence of an Establishment cover-up has emerged as another former local newspaper executive has now claimed that he too was issued with an official warning against reporting on an exclusive paedophile ring, when he was interviewed by an officer working for Operation Fernbridge, the major criminal investigation examining very specific claims of sexual abuse and grooming of children.

Hilton Tims told a Fernbridge detective that his paper, the Surrey Comet, was issued with a D notice in 1984 — an official warning not to publish intelligence that might damage national security — when he sought to report on a police investigation into the notorious Elm Guest House. This is the guest house where Cyril Smith MP and other Establishment figures preyed upon vulnerable children taken there from a nearby children’s home.

Tims joins a list of newspaper editors who have gone on record to testify that similar gagging action took place around the same time. They include Don Hale, former editor of the Bury Messenger who recalled that Special Branch officers seized a paedophile dossier naming Establishment figures drawn up by Labour peer Barbara Castle in the 1980s.

Officers citing “national security” confiscated the file which listed 16 MPs along with other local VIPs.

The dossier was collated with help from concerned social workers by the former Labour MP for Blackburn who personally handed it to him. As well as key members of both the Commons and Lords, the dossier named 30 prominent businessmen, public school teachers, scoutmasters and police officers who had links to the Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE), a group dedicated to legalising sex with young children.

Under the 30-year secrecy rule the National Archives has just released a file prepared for Thatcher which details the paedophile activities of Sir Peter Hayman, a former career diplomat and head of MI6. He was named by Geoffrey Dickens MP in the House of Commons when his name along with many other MPs and government officials, was discovered in a dossier Dickens had collated.

This file is the first clear evidence that Thatcher herself was part of the cover-up.

The director of public prosecutions at the time did nothing either despite correspondence within the dossier showing Hayman’s link to the PIE and evidence of his interest in the sexual torture of young children.

This lack of action mirrored those of the then home secretary Leon Brittan who did nothing and allowed the dossier to get lost in the Home Office.

The historic child sexual abuse scandal continues as the Establishment settle down for the longterm, safe in the knowledge that their sordid secrets are safe from scrutiny, while witnesses are deterred from giving evidence.

– Steven Walker is a Unicef children’s champion.

Westminster paedophile scandal: The evil sex dungeon in Lambeth Town Hall basement

Published March 17, 2015 by misty534

bulic-forsythe

Bulic Forsythe was allegedly killed as a part of a cover up to the abuse against women and children at

Lambeth Council

Senior council officials apparently violently raped and abused women and children in a London council basement during the 1990s, an explosive new report has revealed.

Until now allegations of a paedophile ring operating at Lambeth Council have never been made public.

According to a report, obtained exclusively by Sky News, council figures used the basement of Lambeth’s housing headquarters to carry out the horrific abuse on women, children and even animals “without fear of interruption by other staff”.

Among the allegations includes a female member of staff who described being raped “of horrendous proportions” – suffering serious injuries still one month afterwards. The broadcaster also reported she was raped alongside children and animals by senior members of the council.

Three male employees, including one in a senior position, were suspended from their jobs in the housing department in light of the findings following an internal investigation. But they were removed on grounds of breaching the authority’s ‘equal opportunities policy’. No criminal investigation was launched at the time despite the claims in the report.

But now the Metropolitan Police are investigating the abuse allegations and the 1993 murder case of Lambeth Council’s housing manager Bulic Forsythe under Operation Trinity – linking it to the Westminster paedophile ring that involves high profile politicians and MPs during the 1970s and 1980s.

It is alleged Forsythe could have been killed as part of a cover up after he was made aware of the abuse and wanted to “spill the beans” after visiting one of the council sites.

In the report, it states he told colleagues that he felt at risk and was trying to move from the housing services. It was also claimed he had clashed with a senior council official who is named in the report as the head of the ring.

The report stated: “The murder of Bulic Forsythe was seen by some witnesses as a possible outcome for anyone who strayed too far in their investigation or for those who asked too many questions.

“The panel heard evidence about Bulic Forsythe whilst he was working in social services visiting Hambrook House and speaking to a colleague and telling her that he was going to ‘spill the beans’. Three days later he was killed.”

According to Sky’s investigation, people who held senior positions at the time of the alleged incidents said “the council had elements of dysfunctionality and was plagued by corruption and fear”.

Forsythe’s daughter Kiddist told the broadcaster: “Some of the stuff that’s in here, [the report], I honestly can’t believe happened. I was very shocked.”

Met Police’s detective inspector Sean Crotty said: “This report provides the context to people who were abused in Lambeth. What we need is for people who were children at the time and who were abused to come forward.”

Lambeth Council said it was supporting the police in its investigation.

A spokesman said: “Lambeth Council is determined to do all that we can to support this renewed push to tackle the issue, and ensure that offenders who had previously escaped justice are now held to account.”

It’s the latest scandal to hit the country amid claims of other paedophile rings involving public figures, which the Home Secretary Theresa May calls are just “the tip of the iceberg”,  shockingly claiming the scale of the abuse was “woven, covertly, into the fabric” of British society.

Lambeth Council Alleged Abuse Findings:

There were two sites on Lambeth council property used to carry out sexual assaults. They were used for this purpose “on many occasions over the years”.

Two private removal firms were “frequently” on site, and were believed to have removed evidence of equipment used during sexual assaults, and washed the area down. One firm had keys to all internal lockers, including a cabinet where evidence in a criminal case was kept and later went missing.

Items handed to police following the rape of a female member of staff by a colleague on council premises included a semen-stained blanket, soiled tissues, cassettes and a penknife.

Bulic Forsythe, a manager in the housing department, told colleagues he was going to “spill the beans” after a visit to one of these sites.

He clashed with an individual who held a senior position and is named in the report as the head of the ring involved in abuse, and then moved from the housing department to social services.

While in social services Bulic told another colleague he believed the individual in housing could still ‘get to him’. After his death in 1993, colleagues reported that a report he had compiled went missing from his office.

Three male employees, including one in a senior position, were suspended from their jobs in the housing department as a result of the investigation.

Despite the findings of rape and sexual assault, and possessing indecent images of children, they were suspended on grounds of a ‘breach of the council’s equal opportunities policy’.

The report recommended a criminal investigation into the allegations of rape, child rape and images of abuse, which the Metropolitan Police confirmed never took place.

More about Westminster Paedophile Ring

International Business Times

Cyril Smith ‘put pressure on BBC’ over investigating MPs

Published March 17, 2015 by misty534

Screen Shot 2015-03-17 at 14.20.43

Liberal MP Cyril Smith wrote to the BBC in 1976 asking it not to investigate the “private lives of certain MPs”.

The MP, who died in 2010 and has been accused of abusing children, wrote to the then home secretary about “filth, innuendo and stirring” by reporters.

The BBC investigation had been looking into claims of an alleged foreign-backed campaign to discredit MPs.

Former children’s minister Tim Loughton said the former Rochdale MP’s letters were “bully-boy tactics”.

“It was an abuse of position that somebody as an MP was saying, ‘You shouldn’t look at us, we’re above the law,'” he said.

‘Personal involvement’

Smith had been the subject of an investigation into the alleged abuse of children in Rochdale but the case was not known about publicly, and he was never charged.

Current Rochdale MP Simon Danczuk is due to appear before the Home Affairs Select Committee later, where he is expected to call for a new inquiry to include the activities of Smith.

Mr Danczuk recently published a book alleging more than 140 complaints had been made by victims but Smith had been left free to abuse children as young as eight.

Greater Manchester Police and Rochdale Council are carrying out two separate investigations into child abuse allegations involving the late MP.

More than 100 MPs are calling for a larger inquiry into historical claims of child abuse in schools, hospitals and care homes.

_75940302_smith_letter_1

_75940303_smith_letter2

At the time the media had been investigating a claim made by Prime Minister Harold Wilson that South African secret agents had been trying to smear British MPs.

The Liberal Party was thought to be a particular target because of its outspoken opposition to South Africa’s apartheid policy.

The BBC had employed two freelance journalists, Barrie Penrose and Roger Courtiour, to look into Mr Wilson’s claims.

According to letters in the National Archives, Smith wrote to BBC director general Sir Charles Curran in September 1976 saying he was “deeply concerned about the investigative activities of the BBC”, especially relating to “the private lives of certain MPs”.

“So far as I am aware I am not one of them, and hence I write without personal involvement.”

Public interest

In another letter, Smith urged the then Home Secretary, Merlyn Rees, to ensure the BBC was not using public money for “muck-raking”.

He wrote: “Frankly, I am fed up of the filth, innuendo and stirring that has gone on for the last six months or so about MPs in all three political parties, and I really do think the time has come for something to be published, or for the thing to come to an end.”

The month before Smith wrote his letter, the BBC had ended its contract with Penrose and Courtiour, saying it did not believe it had proper control over where else they might publish their material.

It is understood Smith had not been one of the subjects of their investigation.

Sir Charles responded to Smith, saying the South African story was “a proper subject for journalistic inquiry”.

But he added: “I was not prepared to see public resources devoted to the pursuit of personal dirt, possibly for publication outside the control of the BBC.”

But Roger Courtiour said the two journalists were “totally convinced the story was in the public interest and should have been continued”.

_75943128_cyrildgmemo1

Part of the BBC director general’s memo relating to the South African investigation

On Tuesday, the BBC said: “The documents date back nearly 40 years, so we have no additional commentary to offer, and their content appears to be self-explanatory.”

The Home Office said it would make any decisions about a further inquiry into child abuse after a number of current investigations were complete.

By Tom Bateman

Cyril Smith child sex abuse inquiry ‘scrapped after his arrest’

Published March 17, 2015 by misty534

140428-sir-cyril-smith

Claims that police officers were ordered to hand over evidence are ‘very credible and very frightening’

The Metropolitan Police are facing fresh allegations after it was revealed that an undercover police investigation that gathered evidence of child abuse by MP Cyril Smith was scrapped shortly after his arrest.

The Liberal MP, who died in 2010, was arrested for his alleged involvement in sex parties with teenage boys in south London during the 1980s, a former police officer told BBC Newsnight.

During a three-month secret inquiry into a high-profile child sex abuse ring, police collected compelling video evidence of men abusing boys as young as 14, the source said.

Newsnight was also told that police had evidence that a senior member of Britain’s intelligence agencies and two high-ranking police officers took part in the abuse.

The inquiry is reported to have led to a house in Streatham, where Smith and several others were arrested. Newsnight alleges he was released just hours later without charge.

The decision to scrap the inquiry was made by a high-ranking police officer, whom the undercover team had no prior contact with, the source alleges.

“Officers were then ordered to hand over all their evidence – including notebooks and video footage – and were warned to keep quiet about the investigation or face prosecution under the Official Secrets Act,” reports The BBC’s Nick Hopkins.

Former Scotland Yard detective Clive Driscoll has described the claims as “very credible and very frightening”.

“Smith was being protected by some fairly powerful people […] because he knew of other paedophiles in the networks in which he operated,” said Labour MP Simon Danczuk, who has worked to expose Cyril Smith as a prolific paedophile.

This latest revelation comes just hours after the police watchdog announced that it would be beginning an investigation into claims that the Met Police covered up child sex offences because of the involvement of high-level politicians and police officers.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission has described the allegations as “historic, high-level corruption of the most serious nature”.

The police force refused to comment on the recent allegations, but said that it was investigating allegations that police officers “acted inappropriately” in relation to historic child abuse investigations. It urged anyone with information to come forward.

Met Police probed over claims it covered up child sex abuse

16 March

An investigation has begun into claims that the Metropolitan police covered up child sex offences because of the involvement of high level politicians and police officers, the police watchdog has announced.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission is looking into 16 allegations of high-level corruption in the force from the 1970s to 2005.

“These allegations are of historic, high-level corruption of the most serious nature,” said deputy chairman of the IPCC, Sally Green. “Allegations of this nature are of grave concern and I would like to reassure people our commitment to ensuring that the investigations are thorough and robust.

The investigation will look at claims that London’s police force suppressed evidence and hindered or halted investigations because of the involvement of MPs and police officers.

The list of allegations being investigated include claims that:

  • Police officers sexually abused a young boy and then carried out surveillance on him
  • Surveillance of a child abuse ring was shut down because of “high-profile people being involved”
  • A document, which originated from within the Houses of Parliament, was discovered at a paedophile’s address and listed a number of high-level individuals as being involved in a paedophile ring, but no further action was taken.

The Metropolitan police told the BBC that the force had voluntarily referred the cases to the IPCC because it “recognised the severity of the allegations and the importance of understanding whether or not our officers had in the past acted inappropriately”.

It also said that its ongoing investigations and recent convictions have shown that the service is “fully committed” to investigating non-recent allegations of sexual abuse.

The Week